What Is Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension (nOH)?

To understand neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH), you first have to understand that nOH is a condition that falls under a larger category called orthostatic hypotension (OH), also known as postural hypotension.

OH is a sustained drop in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mmHg that happens within 3 minutes of standing. Certain medications, dehydration, and conditions such as heart disease can lead to OH. Plus, OH tends to happen more often as people get older.

Causes of Orthostatic Hypotension

Heart-related

Heart failure, problems with blood flow, and a decreased volume of blood in your body are some of the potential causes of OH.

Medication-related

Certain medications, such as ones prescribed for high blood pressure, depression, or to treat conditions like Parkinson’s disease, have been found to cause OH.

Nervous system-related

Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure, or other types of autonomic dysfunction can cause OH.

An Issue With Your Nervous System

If you have nOH, it means that the type of orthostatic hypotension that you have is autonomic nervous system-related. Specifically, the body does not release enough norepinephrine. Watch this video to see how nOH impacts your body, causing you to feel faint when you stand or sit up.

Daily Effects

Understand what it's like to live with

symptomatic nOH.

What You Can Do

Learn ways to better

manage neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

Multiple system atrophy

A rare, Parkinson's-like neurological disorder that causes problems with movement, loss of coordination, and malfunction of involuntary bodily functions (such as blood pressure control)

Autonomic dysfunction

Also known as dysautonomia. A term referring to conditions in which the autonomic nervous system does not function properly

Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

A rare disease that affects the autonomic nervous system. DBH is present at birth, but is not typically diagnosed until late childhood, and nearly all patients with DBH will have severe OH by their early adult years.

Autonomic nervous system

One part of the nervous system that helps regulate the many functions in the body that aren’t consciously controlled, including heart rate and blood pressure

Blood pressure

The force the blood has on the arteries. It has two numbers: top/bottom (systolic/diastolic)

Dementia with Lewy bodies

the second most common neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Symptoms include progressive dementia; trouble remembering, learning, concentrating, or making decisions; visual hallucinations; and parkinsonism movement issues like tremor, impaired speech, or muscle stiffness.

Hypotension

Abnormally low blood pressure

Idiopathic

Arising from an unknown cause

Neurogenic

Associated with the nervous system

Parkinson’s disease

A nervous system disorder associated with damage to nerve cells in the brain and nerves that control movement and cause malfunction of involuntary bodily functions (such as blood pressure control)

Pure autonomic failure

A very rare, neurological disorder characterized by damage to regions of the nervous system that control involuntary functions (such as blood pressure control)

Norepinephrine

A neurotransmitter that functions to mobilize the brain and body for action

Orthostatic

Relating to standing up

MSA

A rare, Parkinson's-like neurological disorder that causes problems with movement, loss of coordination, and malfunction of involuntary bodily functions (such as blood pressure control)

PAF

A very rare, neurological disorder characterized by damage to regions of the nervous system that control involuntary functions (such as blood pressure control)

Autonomic dysfunction

Also known as dysautonomia. A term referring to conditions in which the autonomic nervous system does not function properly